AVIS-IBIS

Birds of Indian Subcontinent

Sex-Related Seasonal Differences in the Foraging Strategy of the Kentish Plover (Diferencias Estacionales Relacionadas con el Sexo en la Estrategia de Alimentación de Charadrius alexandrinus)

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2009
Authors:Castro, M, Masero, JA, Perez-Hurtado, A, Amat, JA, Megina, C
Journal:The Condor
Volume:111
Issue:4
Date Published:2009
ISBN Number:00105422
Keywords:Charadriidae, Charadrius, Charadrius alexandrinus, Spain
Abstract:Abstract In species of birds with biparental care, each sex may have its own energy requirements and/or schedule for feeding, possibly leading the sexes to differ in foraging strategy. In estuaries, shorebirds such as the Kentish Plover (Charadrius alexandrinus alexandrinus) may forage on intertidal mudflats and in adjacent supratidal habitats during winter as well as during the breeding season. In this study, we analyzed the diet, use of foraging habitat, food-intake rate (biomass ingested per unit time), and time allocated to foraging by male and female Kentish Plovers at both seasons in an estuary near Cádiz, Spain, where intertidal mudflats and adjacent salt works are the main habitats for foraging. The plovers' main prey was the ragworm (Nereis diversicolor), an intertidal polychaete that supplied more than 80% of the biomass consumed at each season. During the breeding season, both sexes increased their intake rate and decreased their daylight foraging time. By increasing the diurnal intake rate during the breeding season, the birds minimized their time spent foraging on the intertidal mudflats, allowing them to maximize the time for activities associated with breeding in the adjacent salt works. Therefore, the plovers solved the conflict between foraging on the mudflats and breeding in the salt works by shortening the foraging time on the mudflats, minimizing time away from the nesting areas. The sexes differed in the daylight time allocated to foraging, with females spending 2 hr less on foraging and concentrating their feeding activity into the central hours of low tide.
URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/cond.2009.080062
Short Title:The Condor
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith