Seasonal patterns of breeding, moulting, and body mass variation in Pyrenean Common Crossbills Loxia curvirostra curvirostra

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2011
Authors:Alonso, D, Arizaga, J
Journal:Ringing & Migration
Volume:26
Issue:1
Date Published:2011
ISBN Number:0307-8698
Keywords:Fringillidae, Loxia, Loxia curvirostra
Abstract:The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between breeding, moulting and fuel load of Common Crossbills Loxia curvirostra curvirostra inhabiting a Scots pine Pyrenean forest. Data were collected from two locations (Sierra de Uztarroz and Bigüezal) in northern Iberia by systematic mist netting between 2000 and 2008. Breeding females were detected in most months of the year except June, October and November, and with two main peaks, one in late winter (March), and another in the summer (August). Between years, reproduction was more variable in some months than in others, particularly in summer months. This suggests that breeding during the summer was more likely to be influenced by external factors and relatively opportunistic compared to winter breeding. Moulting adults of both sexes were captured during almost every month with a unimodal pattern peaking in June, similar to the pattern described for Mediterranean Crossbills. Moulting did not overlap with breeding, and our data do not support suspended moult patterns. Mean fat scores overall were low and, as was the case for body mass, showed little month-to-month variation.The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between breeding, moulting and fuel load of Common Crossbills Loxia curvirostra curvirostra inhabiting a Scots pine Pyrenean forest. Data were collected from two locations (Sierra de Uztarroz and Bigüezal) in northern Iberia by systematic mist netting between 2000 and 2008. Breeding females were detected in most months of the year except June, October and November, and with two main peaks, one in late winter (March), and another in the summer (August). Between years, reproduction was more variable in some months than in others, particularly in summer months. This suggests that breeding during the summer was more likely to be influenced by external factors and relatively opportunistic compared to winter breeding. Moulting adults of both sexes were captured during almost every month with a unimodal pattern peaking in June, similar to the pattern described for Mediterranean Crossbills. Moulting did not overlap with breeding, and our data do not support suspended moult patterns. Mean fat scores overall were low and, as was the case for body mass, showed little month-to-month variation.
URL:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03078698.2011.587253
Short Title:Ringing & Migration
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith