The partial migration of Fennoscandian Greenfinches Carduelis chloris

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2000
Authors:Main, IG
Journal:Ringing & Migration
Volume:20
Issue:2
Date Published:2000
ISBN Number:0307-8698
Keywords:Carduelis, Carduelis chloris, Chloris, Chloris chloris, Finland, Fringillidae, Gulf of Finland, North Sea, Sweden
Abstract:Recoveries provided by 14 ringing schemes have been used to investigate the partial migration of Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish and Danish Greenfinches Carduelis chloris. More and longer seasonal movements are made by females than by males, and first?year birds travel farther than adults. Most Norwegian migrants cross to Jutland before the end of November and, in company with Danish birds, follow the North Sea coasts to the Low Countries and beyond, returning after the end of March. Most Swedish migrants cross to the Danish islands in October and November and join other Danish birds on a south?westward track somewhat farther from the coast, returning in March, April and May. There is some evidence that Norwegian and Swedish birds pass the Danish natives in a leap?frog movement. Some Finnish migrants move to Sweden, but the majority follow an independent route to the south?west after crossing the Gulf of Finland. Other secondary patterns of migration are described. Most of the overseas movements appear to be of the facultative type, in that individuals do not necessarily make the crossing every year.Recoveries provided by 14 ringing schemes have been used to investigate the partial migration of Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish and Danish Greenfinches Carduelis chloris. More and longer seasonal movements are made by females than by males, and first?year birds travel farther than adults. Most Norwegian migrants cross to Jutland before the end of November and, in company with Danish birds, follow the North Sea coasts to the Low Countries and beyond, returning after the end of March. Most Swedish migrants cross to the Danish islands in October and November and join other Danish birds on a south?westward track somewhat farther from the coast, returning in March, April and May. There is some evidence that Norwegian and Swedish birds pass the Danish natives in a leap?frog movement. Some Finnish migrants move to Sweden, but the majority follow an independent route to the south?west after crossing the Gulf of Finland. Other secondary patterns of migration are described. Most of the overseas movements appear to be of the facultative type, in that individuals do not necessarily make the crossing every year.
URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03078698.2000.9674239
Short Title:Ringing & Migration
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith