AVIS-IBIS

Birds of Indian Subcontinent

Overseas movements to and from Britain by Greenfinches Carduelis cloris

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:1999
Authors:Main, IG
Journal:Ringing & Migration
Volume:19
Issue:3
Date Published:1999
ISBN Number:0307-8698
Keywords:Carduelis, Carduelis chloris, Chloris, Chloris chloris, Denmark, Europe, Fringillidae, Ireland, North Sea, United Kingdom
Abstract:Ring recoveries from Greenfinches making overseas movements to and from Britain are analysed. On average, approximately 0.1% of all British Greenfinches move to Ireland for the winter, and an estimated 2% or more of those breeding in southeast England cross to continental Europe. In the case of the continent, there is evidence for a small movement in the opposite direction. Most Greenfinches moving to the Channel Islands in autumn also originate in south?east England. A few Norwegian Greenfinches cross the North Sea to winter in Scotland or northern England. It is suggested that these are part (not more than about 1%) of a population that normally winters at the Norwegian coast, whereas others found in south?east England are associated with a regular migration through Denmark and continental countries bordering the North Sea, the numbers reaching Britain representing a few percent of that migrating population. A sea crossing to or from Britain is an occasional rather than an annual event for any individual Greenfinch.Ring recoveries from Greenfinches making overseas movements to and from Britain are analysed. On average, approximately 0.1% of all British Greenfinches move to Ireland for the winter, and an estimated 2% or more of those breeding in southeast England cross to continental Europe. In the case of the continent, there is evidence for a small movement in the opposite direction. Most Greenfinches moving to the Channel Islands in autumn also originate in south?east England. A few Norwegian Greenfinches cross the North Sea to winter in Scotland or northern England. It is suggested that these are part (not more than about 1%) of a population that normally winters at the Norwegian coast, whereas others found in south?east England are associated with a regular migration through Denmark and continental countries bordering the North Sea, the numbers reaching Britain representing a few percent of that migrating population. A sea crossing to or from Britain is an occasional rather than an annual event for any individual Greenfinch.
URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03078698.1999.9674181
Short Title:Ringing & Migration
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith