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Birds of Indian Subcontinent

Nest-site characteristics of Woodlarks Lullula arborea breeding on heathlands in southern England: are there consequences for nest survival and productivity?: Capsule Although Woodlarks showed strong preferences for various nest-site characteristics, ther

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2007
Authors:Mallord, JW, Dolman, PM, Brown, A, Sutherland, WJ
Journal:Bird Study
Volume:54
Date Published:2007
ISBN Number:0006-3657
Keywords:Alaudidae, Lullula, Lullula arborea
Abstract:Aim To investigate nesting habitat preferences of Woodlarks, and to assess whether these confer any advantage in terms of nest survival and productivity. Methods Nest-site habitat preferences were measured for Woodlarks nesting on heathlands in Dorset, southern England, and related to nest survival, hatching success and nestling growth. Results Compared to associated habitat patches, Woodlarks were favouring areas of taller, denser vegetation in which to place their nests. Although the majority (81%) of nests were placed at the base of clumps of heather or grass, this was in accordance with the relative abundance of these two vegetation types. There appeared to be a positive selection for tree saplings; however, the number of nests was low (n= 14). There was a strong preference for a north or northeast nest orientation (76%). Despite the strong selection of many microhabitat characteristics, none of them was associated with greater survival, hatching success or chick weight. Conclusion It is probable that Woodlark nesting preferences evolved under different environmental conditions to the ones they experience now, hence the lack of a relationship with nest survival and productivity.Aim To investigate nesting habitat preferences of Woodlarks, and to assess whether these confer any advantage in terms of nest survival and productivity. Methods Nest-site habitat preferences were measured for Woodlarks nesting on heathlands in Dorset, southern England, and related to nest survival, hatching success and nestling growth. Results Compared to associated habitat patches, Woodlarks were favouring areas of taller, denser vegetation in which to place their nests. Although the majority (81%) of nests were placed at the base of clumps of heather or grass, this was in accordance with the relative abundance of these two vegetation types. There appeared to be a positive selection for tree saplings; however, the number of nests was low (n= 14). There was a strong preference for a north or northeast nest orientation (76%). Despite the strong selection of many microhabitat characteristics, none of them was associated with greater survival, hatching success or chick weight. Conclusion It is probable that Woodlark nesting preferences evolved under different environmental conditions to the ones they experience now, hence the lack of a relationship with nest survival and productivity.
URL:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00063650709461490
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith