AVIS-IBIS

Birds of Indian Subcontinent

Movements of Linnets Linaria cannabina in northern Scotland

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2014
Authors:SWANN, ROBERTL, Dillon, IA, Insley, H, Mainwood, T
Journal:Ringing & Migration
Volume:29
Issue:1
Date Published:2014
ISBN Number:0307-8698
Keywords:Fringillidae, Linaria, Linaria cannabina
Abstract:Linnets Linaria cannabina were caught in northern and eastern Scotland from winter 2003/04 to 2012/13, with the majority of catches in low-lying agricultural areas around the Moray Firth. Although most birds breeding around the Moray Firth were sedentary, birds from further north and west in Highland and Orkney undertook long-distance movements to wintering sites, mainly in the Moray Firth area. Within a winter, movements were short, mostly within 5?km of the original trapping site. There was little variation in the median distance moved as the winter progressed. In subsequent winters, there was a tendency for some birds to switch wintering areas, with significantly fewer being found within 5?km of the original catching site. Catches in northwest Sutherland in spring showed high site fidelity in subsequent summers. During the current study no Scottish birds were recovered abroad and the percentage of long distance movements was not significantly different from birds ringed in other areas of Britain and Ireland.Linnets Linaria cannabina were caught in northern and eastern Scotland from winter 2003/04 to 2012/13, with the majority of catches in low-lying agricultural areas around the Moray Firth. Although most birds breeding around the Moray Firth were sedentary, birds from further north and west in Highland and Orkney undertook long-distance movements to wintering sites, mainly in the Moray Firth area. Within a winter, movements were short, mostly within 5?km of the original trapping site. There was little variation in the median distance moved as the winter progressed. In subsequent winters, there was a tendency for some birds to switch wintering areas, with significantly fewer being found within 5?km of the original catching site. Catches in northwest Sutherland in spring showed high site fidelity in subsequent summers. During the current study no Scottish birds were recovered abroad and the percentage of long distance movements was not significantly different from birds ringed in other areas of Britain and Ireland.
URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03078698.2014.932624
Short Title:Ringing & Migration
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith