AVIS-IBIS

Birds of Indian Subcontinent

Forest birds in forest fragments: are fragmentation effects independent of season?

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:1999
Authors:Nour, N, van Damme, R, Matthysen, E, Dhondt, AA
Journal:Bird Study
Volume:46
Issue:3
Date Published:1999
ISBN Number:0006-3657
Keywords:Certhia, Certhia brachydactyla, Certhiidae, Dendrocopos, Dendrocopos major, Dendrocopos minor, Dryobates, Dryobates minor, Fringilla, Fringilla coelebs, Fringillidae, Picidae, Picoides, Picoides major, Picoides minor, Regulidae, Regulus, Regulus regulus, Sitta, Sitta europaea, Sittidae, Sturnidae, Sturnus, Sturnus vulgaris, Xylocopus, Xylocopus minor
Abstract:The aim of this study was to examine whether effects of habitat fragmentation on forest birds persist across seasons. W e noted the presence or absence of 18 bird species in 16 wood plots on 12 occasions (six in winter and six in spring). Woodland area ranged between 0.5 and 200 ha. All patches consisted of mature deciduous woodland. Degree of fragmentation for each woodland patch was indexed by the factor scores on the first two axes resulting fvom a principal component analysis, performed on a number of area and isolation variables. Both in winter and in spring, species richness correlated negatively with degree of fragmentation. The number of species observed was higher in winter than in spring for most patches, but the difference was unrelated to the degree of fragmentation. On a species level, little evidence was found for an effect of interaction between season and degree of fragmentation on the frequency of occurrence. The effects of fragmentation seem to depend on season in the Great Spotted Woodpecker Dendrocopos major and the Treecreeper Certhia brachydactyla, but not in the other species considered. Fragmentation has a negative effect on the frequency of occurrence of the Nuthatch Sitta europaea, Goldcrest Regulus regulus, Treecreeper, Great Spotted Woodpecker and the Starling Sturnus vulgaris, and a positive effect for the Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs and, possibly, the Lesser Spotted Woodpecker Dendrocopos minor. Seasonal changes in frequency of occurrence were noted in four of the species considered.The aim of this study was to examine whether effects of habitat fragmentation on forest birds persist across seasons. W e noted the presence or absence of 18 bird species in 16 wood plots on 12 occasions (six in winter and six in spring). Woodland area ranged between 0.5 and 200 ha. All patches consisted of mature deciduous woodland. Degree of fragmentation for each woodland patch was indexed by the factor scores on the first two axes resulting fvom a principal component analysis, performed on a number of area and isolation variables. Both in winter and in spring, species richness correlated negatively with degree of fragmentation. The number of species observed was higher in winter than in spring for most patches, but the difference was unrelated to the degree of fragmentation. On a species level, little evidence was found for an effect of interaction between season and degree of fragmentation on the frequency of occurrence. The effects of fragmentation seem to depend on season in the Great Spotted Woodpecker Dendrocopos major and the Treecreeper Certhia brachydactyla, but not in the other species considered. Fragmentation has a negative effect on the frequency of occurrence of the Nuthatch Sitta europaea, Goldcrest Regulus regulus, Treecreeper, Great Spotted Woodpecker and the Starling Sturnus vulgaris, and a positive effect for the Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs and, possibly, the Lesser Spotted Woodpecker Dendrocopos minor. Seasonal changes in frequency of occurrence were noted in four of the species considered.
URL:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00063659909461140
Short Title:Bird Study
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith