An Experimental Test of the Concealment Hypothesis Using American Goldfinch Nests

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2003
Authors:Peak, RG
Journal:The Wilson Bulletin
Volume:115
Issue:4
Date Published:2003
ISBN Number:00435643
Keywords:Astragalinus, Astragalinus tristis, Carduelis, Carduelis carduelis, Carduelis tristis, Fringillidae, Pseudomitris, Pseudomitris tristis, Spinus, Spinus tristis
Abstract:I conducted a vegetation removal experiment using American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis) nests to test the hypothesis that predation rates vary with concealment in old field habitats in eastcentral Illinois. Daily predation rates were 0.05 for manipulated nests and 0.04 for control nests. Although manipulated nests were much less concealed than control nests, the probability of predation did not differ significantly between treatments or years. Logistic regression models indicated that nests initiated earlier in the breeding season had a greater probability of predation than nests initiated later in the breeding season. These results indicate that time of breeding season may be more important than concealment in explaining probability of predation of American Goldfinch nests in this old field system.
URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4164599
Short Title:The Wilson Bulletin
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith