AVIS-IBIS

Birds of Indian Subcontinent

Early nesting does not result in greater productivity in the multi-brooded Woodlark Lullula arborea: Capsule Birds that started nesting early and made more nesting attempts did not produce more fledglings or recruits

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2008
Authors:Mallord, JW, Dolman, PM, Brown, A, Sutherland, WJ
Journal:Bird Study
Volume:55
Date Published:2008
ISBN Number:0006-3657
Keywords:Alaudidae, Lullula, Lullula arborea
Abstract:Aims To investigate seasonal trends in reproductive performance of a multi-brooded ground-nesting passerine, and whether re-nesting compensates for loss of productivity to nest predation. Methods Nesting was observed in a Woodlark population breeding on heathlands in Dorset, southern England. Clutch and brood size, hatching success, chick weights, nestling starvation, fledging success and recruitment rates were compared between successive nests of individual females. Results There was a mid-season peak in clutch size, but no seasonal differences in most reproductive parameters. However, proportionally more juveniles that fledged from early nests were recruited into the breeding population. Conclusion Individuals that started nesting earlier had more nesting attempts. However, although such individuals are expected to achieve higher average annual fledging success and to contribute more recruits, neither effect was significant in a sample of 29 and 46 territories over two years, due to high levels of stochastic nest losses through predation.Aims To investigate seasonal trends in reproductive performance of a multi-brooded ground-nesting passerine, and whether re-nesting compensates for loss of productivity to nest predation. Methods Nesting was observed in a Woodlark population breeding on heathlands in Dorset, southern England. Clutch and brood size, hatching success, chick weights, nestling starvation, fledging success and recruitment rates were compared between successive nests of individual females. Results There was a mid-season peak in clutch size, but no seasonal differences in most reproductive parameters. However, proportionally more juveniles that fledged from early nests were recruited into the breeding population. Conclusion Individuals that started nesting earlier had more nesting attempts. However, although such individuals are expected to achieve higher average annual fledging success and to contribute more recruits, neither effect was significant in a sample of 29 and 46 territories over two years, due to high levels of stochastic nest losses through predation.
URL:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00063650809461516
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith