Clinical Signs and Histopathologic Findings Associated with a Newly Recognized Protozoal Disease (Trichomonas gallinae) in Free-Ranging House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus)

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2010
Authors:Anderson, NL, Johnson, CK, Fender, S, Heckly, S, Metzler, M, Nave, P, Yim, J
Journal:Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Volume:41
Issue:2
Date Published:2010
ISBN Number:1042-7260
Keywords:Carpodacus, Carpodacus mexicanus, Fringillidae, Haemorhous, Haemorhous mexicanus
Abstract:Abstract This paper describes the clinical signs and histopathologic findings associated with an emergent disease associated with Trichomonas gallinae infections in free-ranging house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) in California. Wet mounts were necessary to detect T. gallinae infections in house finches because classical clinical presentation, such as caseous stomatitis or ingluvitis, occurred in <25% of cases. Early detection was instrumental in preventing trichomonosis outbreaks in a high-density nursery (P < 0.0001). Detection before onset of clinical signs was critical. Despite treatment, ?95% of house finches died within 24 hr of displaying signs of illness. In contrast, 58% of T. gallinae?positive house finches housed in a nursery survived if they received treatment before onset of clinical signs. Recurrent protozoal shedding in survivors was not evident.Abstract This paper describes the clinical signs and histopathologic findings associated with an emergent disease associated with Trichomonas gallinae infections in free-ranging house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) in California. Wet mounts were necessary to detect T. gallinae infections in house finches because classical clinical presentation, such as caseous stomatitis or ingluvitis, occurred in <25% of cases. Early detection was instrumental in preventing trichomonosis outbreaks in a high-density nursery (P < 0.0001). Detection before onset of clinical signs was critical. Despite treatment, ?95% of house finches died within 24 hr of displaying signs of illness. In contrast, 58% of T. gallinae?positive house finches housed in a nursery survived if they received treatment before onset of clinical signs. Recurrent protozoal shedding in survivors was not evident.
URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1638/2009-0188R.1
Short Title:Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith