Birds in European gardens in the winter and spring of 1988–89

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:1993
Authors:Thompson, PS, Greenwood, JJD, Greenaway, K
Journal:Bird Study
Volume:40
Date Published:1993
ISBN Number:0006-3657
Keywords:Carduelis, Carduelis chloris, Chloris, Chloris chloris, Corvidae, Cyanistes, Cyanistes caeruleus, Erithacus, Erithacus rubecula, Europe, Fringilla, Fringilla coelebs, Fringillidae, Merula, Muscicapidae, Paridae, Parus, Parus caeruleus, Parus major, Passer, Passer domesticus, Passeridae, Pica, Pica hudsonia, Pica pica, Turdidae, Turdus, Turdus maximus, Turdus merula, Western Europe
Abstract:A survey of the occurence of birds in gardens in 14 countries in western Europe was conducted between 23 October 1988 and 20 May 1989. Most of the 440 participating gardens were on the edge of towns and 40% had trees, grass and shrubs. Their average size as 1608 m 2. One hundred and seventy-six species of birds were recorded in all, with a mean of 21 per garden. Garden size was the most important factor determining the number of species present; gardens with both deciduous and coniferous trees had comparatively many species; urban gardens had comparatively few. The frequency with which artificial food was provided had little effect on the number of species recorded in a garden. The frequency of provision differed between countries but was uniformly greater in winter than in spring. Although there were substantial regional differences, the broad suite of species entering gardens was similar throughout Europe, the commonest species being Great Tit, Blackbird, Blue Tit, House Sparrow, Chaffinch, Greenfinch, Robin and Magpie. The occurrence of many species in gardens varied seasonally, particularly in relation to migration patterns.A survey of the occurence of birds in gardens in 14 countries in western Europe was conducted between 23 October 1988 and 20 May 1989. Most of the 440 participating gardens were on the edge of towns and 40% had trees, grass and shrubs. Their average size as 1608 m 2. One hundred and seventy-six species of birds were recorded in all, with a mean of 21 per garden. Garden size was the most important factor determining the number of species present; gardens with both deciduous and coniferous trees had comparatively many species; urban gardens had comparatively few. The frequency with which artificial food was provided had little effect on the number of species recorded in a garden. The frequency of provision differed between countries but was uniformly greater in winter than in spring. Although there were substantial regional differences, the broad suite of species entering gardens was similar throughout Europe, the commonest species being Great Tit, Blackbird, Blue Tit, House Sparrow, Chaffinch, Greenfinch, Robin and Magpie. The occurrence of many species in gardens varied seasonally, particularly in relation to migration patterns.
URL:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00063659309477137
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith