Bird ringing in Britain and Ireland in 2000

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2002
Authors:Clark, JA, Balmer, DE, Blackburn, JR, Milne, LJ, Robinson, RA, Wernham, CV, ADAMS, SUEY, Griffin, BM
Journal:Ringing & Migration
Volume:21
Issue:1
Date Published:2002
ISBN Number:0307-8698
Keywords:Acrocephalus schoenobaenus, Acrocephalus scirpaceus, Calamodus schoenobaenus, Carduelis cannabina, Cyanistes, Cyanistes caeruleus, Europe, Fringilla coelebs, Fringillidae, Ireland, Paridae, Parus caeruleus, Parus major, Parus montanus, Phylloscopus trochilus, Poecile montanus, Pyrrhula, Pyrrhula pyrrhula, Saxicola rubetra, Scolopacidae, Sylvia atricapilla, Sylvia borin, Sylvia communis, Tringa, Tringa totanus, United Kingdom
Abstract:This is the 64th annual report of the British Trust for Ornithology's Ringing Scheme presenting work carried out and data received in 2000. Ringing birds is an important tool for conservation and research, providing information on survival, productivity and movements of birds. Much progress has been made in developing Integrated Population Monitoring (IPM) models to identify key aspects of a species? biology. Studies on Marsh and Willow Tits and on Bullfinches focussed on developing models for these species, which are of particular conservation concern. A further study described some advances in statistical theory that can be used in IPM models. A study of Redshank movements showed differences before and after closure of a tidal barrage in Cardiff Bay in south Wales. Data collected by the Constant Effort Sites (CES) Scheme showed mixed fortunes for breeding birds. Adult numbers increased significantly for four species (Long?tailed Tit, Sedge Warbler, Reed Warbler and Whitethroat) and four species showed significant declines (Linnet, Garden Warbler, Blackcap and Willow Warbler). Similarly, productivity increased significantly for three species (Blue Tit, Blackcap and Willow Warbler) and decreased significantly for three species (Reed Warbler, Chaffinch and Bullfinch). Initial work on a project to develop standard CES methods across Europe is described. 101 datasets for 43 species were submitted for the Retrapping Adults for Survival (RAS) Project. The number of birds ringed in 2000 (734,235) was 8% lower than the five?year mean 1995?1999. The recovery total (10,912) was 6% below the mean of the previous five years (1995?1999). Recoveries of 156 BTO?ringed birds and 81 birds ringed abroad are presented in the report, including a number of significant movements of an unusual nature. Particularly noteworthy are the first report abroad of a BTO?ringed Shorelark, the first BTO?ringed Whinchat to be recovered on the wintering grounds and a Great Tit that was ringed at Rybachiy in Russia in September 1999 and recaught in Cleveland in February the following year.This is the 64th annual report of the British Trust for Ornithology's Ringing Scheme presenting work carried out and data received in 2000. Ringing birds is an important tool for conservation and research, providing information on survival, productivity and movements of birds. Much progress has been made in developing Integrated Population Monitoring (IPM) models to identify key aspects of a species? biology. Studies on Marsh and Willow Tits and on Bullfinches focussed on developing models for these species, which are of particular conservation concern. A further study described some advances in statistical theory that can be used in IPM models. A study of Redshank movements showed differences before and after closure of a tidal barrage in Cardiff Bay in south Wales. Data collected by the Constant Effort Sites (CES) Scheme showed mixed fortunes for breeding birds. Adult numbers increased significantly for four species (Long?tailed Tit, Sedge Warbler, Reed Warbler and Whitethroat) and four species showed significant declines (Linnet, Garden Warbler, Blackcap and Willow Warbler). Similarly, productivity increased significantly for three species (Blue Tit, Blackcap and Willow Warbler) and decreased significantly for three species (Reed Warbler, Chaffinch and Bullfinch). Initial work on a project to develop standard CES methods across Europe is described. 101 datasets for 43 species were submitted for the Retrapping Adults for Survival (RAS) Project. The number of birds ringed in 2000 (734,235) was 8% lower than the five?year mean 1995?1999. The recovery total (10,912) was 6% below the mean of the previous five years (1995?1999). Recoveries of 156 BTO?ringed birds and 81 birds ringed abroad are presented in the report, including a number of significant movements of an unusual nature. Particularly noteworthy are the first report abroad of a BTO?ringed Shorelark, the first BTO?ringed Whinchat to be recovered on the wintering grounds and a Great Tit that was ringed at Rybachiy in Russia in September 1999 and recaught in Cleveland in February the following year.
URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03078698.2002.9674274
Short Title:Ringing & Migration
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith