Autumn movements of Citril Finch Serinus citrinella citrinella in the southern Alps

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:1998
Authors:Fornasari, L, Carabella, M, Corti, W, Pianezza, F
Journal:Ringing & Migration
Volume:19
Issue:1
Date Published:1998
ISBN Number:0307-8698
Keywords:Carduelis, Carduelis citrinella, Citrinella, Fringillidae, Serinus, Serinus citrinella, Serinus serinus
Abstract:Autumn movements of the Citril Finch in the Alpine range are known only in a general way. In Lombardy, the winter expansion of the breeding range is documented by the comparison of the breeding and the wintering atlas maps, while the arrival of birds from abroad is indicated by few retraps of ringed birds. The number of Citril Finches ringed in Lombardy was quite small until 1991 (92 birds starting from 1977). In autumn 1992 we set up two new ringing places, in the Orobie Alps, catching and ringing 206 Citril Finches out of a yearly regional total of 221. The pattern of catches, similar in the two places, shows that something like a real migration occurs; the timing of catches and the discovery to the south of two birds ringed in the northern site indicates that the two sites lie on the same migration route. Some indications in favour of this ?migration? hypothesis derive also from the analysis of biometrical data (weight and fat variation and wing length).Autumn movements of the Citril Finch in the Alpine range are known only in a general way. In Lombardy, the winter expansion of the breeding range is documented by the comparison of the breeding and the wintering atlas maps, while the arrival of birds from abroad is indicated by few retraps of ringed birds. The number of Citril Finches ringed in Lombardy was quite small until 1991 (92 birds starting from 1977). In autumn 1992 we set up two new ringing places, in the Orobie Alps, catching and ringing 206 Citril Finches out of a yearly regional total of 221. The pattern of catches, similar in the two places, shows that something like a real migration occurs; the timing of catches and the discovery to the south of two birds ringed in the northern site indicates that the two sites lie on the same migration route. Some indications in favour of this ?migration? hypothesis derive also from the analysis of biometrical data (weight and fat variation and wing length).
URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03078698.1998.9674158
Short Title:Ringing & Migration
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith