AVIS-IBIS

Birds of Indian Subcontinent

Agricultural habitat-type and the breeding performance of granivorous farmland birds in Britain

Publication Type:Journal Article
Year of Publication:2000
Authors:Siriwardena, GM, Crick, HQP, Baillie, SR, Wilson, JD
Journal:Bird Study
Volume:47
Date Published:2000
ISBN Number:0006-3657
Keywords:Acanthis cannabina, Alauda, Alauda arvensis, Alaudidae, Carduelis, Carduelis cannabina, Carduelis chloris, Chloris, Chloris chloris, Citrinella, Columba, Columba oenas, Columbidae, Emberiza, Emberiza calandra, Emberiza citrinella, Emberiza godlewskii, Emberiza schoeniclus, Emberizidae, Fringilla, Fringilla coelebs, Fringillidae, Linaria, Linaria cannabina, Miliaria, Miliaria calandra, Passer, Passer montanus, Passeridae, Pyrrhula, Pyrrhula pyrrhula, Salicipasser, Salicipasser montanus, Schoeniclus, Schoeniclus schoeniclus, United Kingdom
Abstract:Conservation concern about granivorous birds has led to the implication of changing agricultural practices as causes of widespread population decline. We investigate relationships between breeding performance and the agricultural environment for ten granivorous farmland bird species (Stock Dove Columba oenas, Skylark Alauda arvensis, Tree Sparrow Passer montanus, Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs, Greenfinch Carduelis chloris, Linnet C. cannabina, Bullfinch Pyrrhula pyrrhula, Reed Bunting Emberiza schoeniclus, Yellowhammer E. citrinella and Corn Bunting Miliaria calandra). We analyse long-term, extensive data from the British Trust for Ornithology's Nest Record Scheme on breeding performance per breeding attempt with respect to farmland type (arable, grazing or mixed) and time (pre- and post-1975?76). The influence of habitat is investigated at two different scales: within the nesting territory and at the landscape level. Relationships between farmland type and (temporal changes in) breeding performance tended to be species-specific, but a few patterns were each common to some species. Improvements in breeding performance occurred across all three farmland types for four declining species. Grazing farmland seems to have deteriorated as breeding habitat for Linnet and arable/mixed farmland for Reed Bunting. Mixed farming at the territory scale supported better breeding performance for four species, three of which (Bullfinch, Yellowhammer and Corn Bunting) have declined concurrently with mixed farming. Pastoral landscapes supported better breeding performance for up to seven species, six of which have undergone large declines. Arable landscapes supported better breeding only for the stable or increasing Chaffinch and Greenfinch. Different relationships between farming regime and breeding performance were found at the two scales considered.Conservation concern about granivorous birds has led to the implication of changing agricultural practices as causes of widespread population decline. We investigate relationships between breeding performance and the agricultural environment for ten granivorous farmland bird species (Stock Dove Columba oenas, Skylark Alauda arvensis, Tree Sparrow Passer montanus, Chaffinch Fringilla coelebs, Greenfinch Carduelis chloris, Linnet C. cannabina, Bullfinch Pyrrhula pyrrhula, Reed Bunting Emberiza schoeniclus, Yellowhammer E. citrinella and Corn Bunting Miliaria calandra). We analyse long-term, extensive data from the British Trust for Ornithology's Nest Record Scheme on breeding performance per breeding attempt with respect to farmland type (arable, grazing or mixed) and time (pre- and post-1975?76). The influence of habitat is investigated at two different scales: within the nesting territory and at the landscape level. Relationships between farmland type and (temporal changes in) breeding performance tended to be species-specific, but a few patterns were each common to some species. Improvements in breeding performance occurred across all three farmland types for four declining species. Grazing farmland seems to have deteriorated as breeding habitat for Linnet and arable/mixed farmland for Reed Bunting. Mixed farming at the territory scale supported better breeding performance for four species, three of which (Bullfinch, Yellowhammer and Corn Bunting) have declined concurrently with mixed farming. Pastoral landscapes supported better breeding performance for up to seven species, six of which have undergone large declines. Arable landscapes supported better breeding only for the stable or increasing Chaffinch and Greenfinch. Different relationships between farming regime and breeding performance were found at the two scales considered.
URL:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00063650009461161
Scratchpads developed and conceived by (alphabetical): Ed Baker, Katherine Bouton Alice Heaton Dimitris Koureas, Laurence Livermore, Dave Roberts, Simon Rycroft, Ben Scott, Vince Smith