Genus PHALAROPUS

Anterior toes bordered throughout by a web cut into lobes, as in Coots and Grebes. In other respects the present genus does not differ materially from Tringa and its allies. By many naturalists the Phalaropes are made into a separate subfamily, and they have some claim to the distinction; but they are after all only modified Sandpipers, although, unlike those shore-birds, they are found swimming in the open sea, sometimes even out of sight of land. They breed in high northern latitudes, on the shores of the sea or of lakes, and lay four ochreous eggs, spotted and blotched as usual in the family. The males incubate, and, as so frequently happens in such cases, are inferior in size and in the completeness of the nuptial plumage to the females.

Three species are known, differing considerably in structure, so that each has been made the type of a separate genus. Two have occurred in India.
Key to the Species.

a. Bill slender, subcylindrical, anteriorly narrower than the tarsus ; wing about 4.25…………………………P. hyperboreus, p. 281.
b. Bill flat, broader than high, or than the tarsus; wing 5 to 5.5…………………………P. fulicarius, p. 282.

BookTitle: 
The Fauna Of British India, Including Ceylon And Burma-birds
Reference: 
Blanford, William Thomas, ed. The Fauna of British India: Including Ceylon and Burma. Vol. 4. 1898.
Title in Book: 
Genus PHALAROPUS
Book Author: 
William Thomas Blanford
Year: 
1898
Page No: 
280
M_ID: 
4376
M_SN: 
Phalaropus
Volume: 
Vol. 4
Term name: 
id: 
2133

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