Genus CYANOPS

Except the form of the bill, which is much shorter, with a less curved culmen, there is but little to distinguish this genus from the last. The culmen is not longer than the tarsus, or if longer, then very slightly so. The wing is much rounded, the 2nd primary being shorter than any other primary except the 1st, and the 3rd shorter than the 4th. The plumage is chiefly green, the head and neck being decorated with patches of bright colour, red, yellow, or blue.

Twelve species are known, distributed over the Oriental region ; of these seven occur within Indian limits.

Key to the Species.

a. Chin and throat blue or bluish green.
a1. Crown red; a black band across vertex………………………….C. asiatica, p. 92.
b1. Crown red; a blue band across vertex………………………….C. davisoni, p. 93.
c1. Crown bluish green; narrow frontal band crimson………………………….C. incognita, p. 94.
d1. Forehead and sinciput golden yellow; occiput green ………………………….C. flavifrons, p. 94.
e1. Sinciput black; occiput blue………………………….C. cyanotis, p. 95.
b. Chin and throat yellow and grey.
f1. Supercilium black ………………………….C. franklinia. 96.
g1. Supercilium mixed black and grey………………………….C. ramsayi, p. 97.

BookTitle: 
The Fauna Of British India including Ceylon and Burma
Reference: 
Blanford, William Thomas, ed. The Fauna of British India: Including Ceylon and Burma. Vol.3 1895.
Title in Book: 
Genus CYANOPS
Book Author: 
William Thomas Blanford
Year: 
1895
Page No: 
92
M_ID: 
10018
M_SN: 
Megalaima
Volume: 
Vol. 3
Term name: 
id: 
1392

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