Caprimulgus albonotatus

Caprimulgus albonotatus, Tick.

109. :- Jerdon's Birds of India, Vol. I, p. 194.

THE LARGE BENGAL NIGHT-JAR.

Length, 13; expanse, 25 ; wing, 9 ; tail, 7.

Crown and tertiaries cinerascent, minutely mottled and marked with a stripe of black dashes along the middle of the crown; upper range of scapularies black, more developed in the male, and bordered more broadly externally with rufescent white ; a broad white patch in front of the neck, as in several allied species; a double spot, or interrupted band of white on both webs of the first four primaries contracted and rufescent in the female; two outer tail feathers broadly tipped with white in the male, tinged with fulvous, or rufescent, in the female ; rictorial bristles white at the base, black tipped; altogether the females are usually paler, more brown, and less ashy than the males.

According to Tickell (quoted by Jerdon) the large Bengal Night-jar is common in the jungles of Central India.

BookTitle: 
Handbook to the Birds of the Bombay Presidency
Reference: 
Barnes, Henry Edwin. Handbook to the birds of the Bombay Presidency, 1885.
Title in Book: 
Caprimulgus albonotatus
Spp Author: 
Tick.
Book Author: 
Barnes, H. Edwin
Year: 
1885
Page No: 
90
Common name: 
Large Bengal Night Jar
M_ID: 
7318
M_SN: 
Caprimulgus macrurus albonotatus
id: 
11310

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