1090. Caprimulgus monticola

1090. Caprimulgus monticola.

Franklins Nightjar.

Caprimulgus monticolus, Franklin, F. Z. S. 1831, p. 116 ; Blyth, Cat. p. 84; Horsf. M. Cat. i, p. 114; Jerdon, B. I. i, p. 198; Beavan, Ibis, 1865, p. 406,1869, p. 406; Blyth, Ibis, 1866, p. 342; Adam, S. F. i, p. 371; Ball, S. F. ii, p. 385; vii, p. 203 ; Godw.-Aust. J. A. S. B. xliii, pt. 2, p. 153; Blyth & Wald. Birds Burm. p. 83; Hume, S. F. in, p. 455; x, p. 349; xi, p. 40; id. Cat. no. 114; Butler, S. F. v, p. 227; ix, p. 381; Davison, S. F. v, p. 453; Hume & Dav. S. F. vi, p. 59: Vidal, S. F. ix, p. 48; Bingham, ibid. p. 151; Davidson, S. F. x, p. 295; Macgregor, ibid. p. 436; Oates, B. B. ii, p. 18 ; id. in Hume's N. & E. 2nd ed. iii, p. 51; C. H. T. Marshall, Ibis, 1884, p. 409 ; Barnes, Birds Bom. p. 92; id. Jour. Bom. N. H. Soc. i, p. 43; iv, p. 8, pl. fig. 114 (egg); Hartert, Cat. B. M. xvi, p. 547.

Coloration. Male. General colour above brown or brownish grey, with indistinct black markings and with rufous edges and spots on the scapulars and wing-coverts; no black stripes on the back; a partial collar of buff spots, sometimes inconspicuous ; tail-feathers with distinct blackish cross-bands; a large white spot or band in the middle of the first four primaries; two outer pairs of tail-feathers entirely white except at the tip ; a white spot on the throat, the white feathers with dark tips, some rufous spots on the breast; rest of lower parts to breast mottled brown, the abdomen and lower tail-coverts buff, with bars on the former only.

The female has no white on the tail-feathers, which are all barred throughout, and the spots on the first four primaries are rufous buff.

Bill and gape pale brown; irides dark brown; legs and feet pale fleshy brown (Bingham).

Length about 10; tail 4.5; wing 7.5; tarsus, almost entirely naked, .82.

Distribution. Throughout the greater part of India, from Sambhar in Rajputana, Mount Abu and Kattywar to Mysore (but not apparently further south, nor in Ceylon); also throughout the Lower Himalayas, in Burma locally as far south as Amherst, in Cochin China and Southern China.

Habits, &c. This bird is badly named, for it is by no means a hill species ; its especial haunt appears to be thin forest. In the more jungly parts of the Southern Central Provinces I found it by far the commonest Nightjar. The call is very similar to that of 0. asiaticus. The eggs are usually cream-coloured, spotted and blotched with faint purple and pale brown, and measure about 1.16 by .84.

BookTitle: 
The Fauna Of British India including Ceylon and Burma
Reference: 
Blanford, William Thomas, ed. The Fauna of British India: Including Ceylon and Burma. Vol.3 1895.
Title in Book: 
1090. Caprimulgus monticola
Book Author: 
William Thomas Blanford
CatNo: 
1090
Year: 
1895
Page No: 
185
Common name: 
Franklins Nightjar
M_ID: 
7355
M_SN: 
Caprimulgus affinis monticolus
Volume: 
Vol. 3
id: 
1519

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