84. Aegithaliscus niveogularis

(84) Aegithaliseus niveogularis (Moore).
THE WHITE-THROATED TIT.
AEgithaliscus niveogularis, Fauna B. I., Birds, 2nd ed. vol. i, p. 98.
The breeding range of the White-throated Tit extends from Chitral and Baluchistan to Gilgit and East to the Simla States and Garhwal Hills at elevations between 6,000 and 12,000 feet, probably only nesting at the higher elevations.
Whymper was the first person to discover the nest and eggs of this bird and he describes their nidification (Journ. Bomb. Nat. Hist. Soc. vol. xvii, p. 817, 1907) as follows :—
“This Tit I found by no means uncommon at about 11,000 to 12,000 feet. Several parties of young were about and three nests with young were found, and I was inclined to think it was too late for eggs, but on June 14th a bird was seen carrying a feather, and the nest was soon discovered. It Was placed in the fork of a willow about six feet up, a globular nest resembling that of the Red-headed Tit, but larger ; it was profusely lined with Monal feathers, many of them quite large ones, over three inches long, with hard stiff quills, not at all a comfortable lining one would have thought for so small a bird. I took four fresh eggs from it on June the 26th ; they are white, rather feebly spotted with pink at the larger end and show no trace of the zone of colour that is so marked hi the eggs of the Red-headed Tit. Some of the nests were from 28 to 30 feet up in trees.”
Whymper’s notes refer to Tehri Garhwal and later in the same country, but in the Tons Valley Osmaston again obtained a nest and eggs, which he found by watching one of the parent birds carrying food which, in his words, “gave away the position of the nest, which was placed in the fork of a Cherry-tree, 10 feet from the ground.
“The nest exactly resembled that of the English Long-tailed Tit. It harmonized so closely with its surroundings (lichen-covered bark) that it would probably have escaped my notice had its position not been betrayed by the parent bird.
“The nest was copiously lined with feathers, mainly those of the Monal pheasants. It contained half fledged young.”
Both Dodsworth and Jones obtained this Tit at Simla and the former sent me eggs as of those of the Red-headed Tit which proved later, when I saw the skin, to be of this species. Unfortunately this was after Mr. Dodsworth’s death so I could get no further details. The eggs taken by Whymper vary in size between 14.3 x 11.2 and 14.0 x 10.8 mm.

BookTitle: 
The Nidification Of Birds Of The Indian Empire
Reference: 
Baker, Edward Charles Stuart. The nidification of birds of the Indian Empire. Vol. 1. 1932.
Title in Book: 
84. Aegithaliscus niveogularis
Spp Author: 
Moore.
Book Author: 
Edward Charles Stuart Baker
CatNo: 
84
Year: 
1932
Page No: 
76
Common name: 
White Throated Tit
M_ID: 
22907
M_CN: 
White-throated Bushtit
M_SN: 
Aegithalos niveogularis
Volume: 
Vol. 1
id: 
13300

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