THE BAMBOO-PARTRIDGES

THE BAMBOO-PARTRIDGES

The Bamboo-Partridges form a small group of game birds confined to the Burmo-Chinese countries. They approach the Pheasants in the shape of the wing, and they appear to be closely allied to the Spur-Fowl. They differ from the Partridges in the longer and more graduated tail. Altogether they seem to form a connecting link between the Partridges and the Pheasants.

In the sole species of this group found within our limits, the sexes are alike. The tail, composed of 14 feathers, is rather long and much graduated. The male (sometimes the female also) has a sharp spur on each leg.

The plumage of this Partridge is very handsome, the sides of the body and the lower part of the breast being covered with large heart-shaped black spots. The upper plumage is also much variegated with large black spots, as in the Hill-Partridges. The first ten quills of the wing are chiefly rufous or chestnut, and this character, together with the black spots on the plumage, should suffice to separate this species at once from all other Indian Partridges. The shape of the wing is peculiar, and resembles that of the majority of Pheasants, the first quill being shorter than the tenth.

BookTitle: 
A Manual Of The Game Birds Of India(land Birds)
Reference: 
Oates, Eugene Wifliam. A manual of the game birds of India. Vol.1. 1898.
Title in Book: 
THE BAMBOO-PARTRIDGES
Book Author: 
Eugene William Oates
Year: 
1898
Page No: 
208
Common name: 
THE BAMBOO-PARTRIDGES
Volume: 
Vol. 1
id: 
9709

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