THE BUSH-QUAILS

THE BUSH-QUAILS.

The Bush-Quails, of which five species are known, are peculiar to the Indian Empire. They are birds of small size, not smaller than the smallest Quail, but considerably smaller than the Grey Quail. Their plumage is firm and richly coloured, and exhibits those streaks on the upper surface which characterise the Quails. Nevertheless they must be looked upon as small Partridges rather than Quails. The sexes differ in plumage; very greatly in some species. They are, however, of much the same size.

The Bush-Quails may conveniently be divided into two sections. In the first (Microperdix) the tail is composed of ten feathers. In the second (Perdicula) the tail is composed of twelve feathers and the male birds have a small tubercle or very blunt spur on each leg.

I may here repeat that the Bush-Quails can never be confounded with the Quails if it is remembered that in all the species of the former group the outer web of the quills of the wing is always barred or marked with rufous, and that moreover no Bush-Quail has the sides of the body streaked.

BookTitle: 
A Manual Of The Game Birds Of India(land Birds)
Reference: 
Oates, Eugene Wifliam. A manual of the game birds of India. Vol.1. 1898.
Title in Book: 
THE BUSH-QUAILS.
Book Author: 
Eugene William Oates
Year: 
1898
Page No: 
99
Common name: 
THE BUSH-QUAILS.
Volume: 
Vol. 1
id: 
9672

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